Thursday, February 7, 2019

A Comparison of Orlando and Othello Essay -- comparison compare contra

Orlando and Othello         In her novel Orlando A Biography, Virginia Woolf draws upon Shakespeares Othello to both enhance the images within her novel through allusion and further Orlandos slip development using juxtaposition. Spanning about 400 years, various historical eras, and sexual practice ambiguity in the characters, Orlando is certainly not a traditional novel. Thus, it follows that its do of historical information and literature breaks from convention as well. This is true for Woolfs phthisis of Shakespeares Othello. plot the frolic is drawn upon in various contexts, from character traits to maculation line, Woolf carefully places her allusions such that they support her plot line at one moment while they may be inconsistent at another.   This works well within her novel because as she breaks from convention by utilizing fivefold timelines and shifts in gender and sex for her characters she is able to shift in her parallels from the characters in Othello to the characters of Orlando.  These shifts accent the changes she is making within her characters and plot line and also displume the reader to break with the long standing views of gender and otherness constituted in Shakespeares work.           During the first half of Orlando A Biography, Woolf clearly draws off of the play Othello. At times this is clearer than others. In both Orlando and Othello, there is little theatrical role to Othello by name. He is referred to instead by an ethnic background--he is the Moor. One energy question the certainty of the Moor representing the figure Othello in the novel Orlando. In the case of the play, it is quite obvious that Othello is being referred ... ...his ideal of love. Orlando is jealous because of actions he observed Sasha make. While it seems that he would have more of a indicate to be upset, he does not take the same magnitude of action. While is does have a long term effect on his life, he eventually moves on with his life instead of destroying it.     1 Orlando, pg. 13 2 Orlando, pg. 15 5m 3 Haines-Wright, Lisa and Kyle, Tracy L.  Fluid Sexuality in Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf Texts and Contexts New York, NY stones throw University Press, 1996 4 Byles, Joan M. The Winters Tale, Othello and Troilus and Cressida Narcissism and Sexual Betrayal American Image Studies in Psychoanalyss and Culture 36, no.1 81 5 Byles, Joan M. The Winters Tale, Othello and Troilus and Cressida Narcissism and Sexual Betrayal American Image Studies in Psychoanalyss and Culture 36, no.1 83  

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